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North America's Leading Energy Event
June 9 - 11, 2020
Stampede Park - Calgary, Canada

Poster Session

Technical posters cover a wide range of topics in the energy industry and will be presented on the exhibition floor during specific scheduled times throughout the three days at Global Energy Show.

Poster topics covered include:

  • Alternative Energy
  • Drilling & Completion
  • E&P Geoscience
  • Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)
  • Environmental Management
  • Field Development & Infrastructure
  • Health & Safety
  • People & Talent
  • Pipeline & Processing Facilities
  • Post Production
  • Reservoir Engineering

Free to view and attend with exhibition visitor and conference registration badge

Location: Hall DE, BMO Centre, Stampede Park

Come and meet the authors of the posters at designated times throughout the three days of the exhibition and conference.

June 9, 2020

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM

June 10, 2020

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM

June 11, 2020

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

A Targeted Catalytic Approach Towards Reducing Diluent in Oil Sands Processes

Category: Field Development & Infrastructure

Recent growth of bitumen production in the Oil Sands has outpaced the construction of new takeaway capacity, causing a widening of the heavy-to-light differential and a deterioration in the profitability of many SAGD producers. Coupled with staunch opposition to the timely approval and construction of new pipelines, this environment is set to remain for the near-term, causing many to search for cost-effective alternatives for bitumen transportation. Within this paper, we describe the development of a novel technology, which represents a viable and actionable process for reducing the volume of diluent required to produce a transportable product by up to 50% while simultaneously increasing existing transportation infrastructure by 15%. The approach detailed here centers on building a fundamental understanding of the asphaltenic fraction of a given bitumen - believed to drive the viscous nature of heavier crudes - followed by the rational design of a catalyst system best-suited to breakdown these larger and less-mobile components. While virtually impossible to completely describe native asphaltene structure, the use of powerful analytical tools and techniques does allow for the direct characterization of various structural moieties present within the range of asphaltene molecules. Provided this information, molecular models are deployed to evaluate the near-infinite number of possible chemical conformations, proposing a most energetically-favoured, and therefore, statistically-likely, asphaltene molecule that satisfies said analytical analysis. Lastly, quantum mechanical methods are applied to identify and rationally design reaction conditions tailored for the target chemical structure to maximize reactivity. The ultimate result is a mild-catalytic system capable of significant modification of the heavier components of bitumen, drastically reducing viscosity by more than 95%, while utilizing a lower thermal input (below 350ºC) than traditional catalytic approaches deployed at the refinery. An intended side-effect of this low-severity approach is the suppression of elimination reaction products, minimizing the formation of undesired by-products such as olefins (confirmed via 1H NMR), the existence of which prohibits the ability to blend the crude product with existing market pools. By avoiding the formation of olefins, this approach negates the need for post-reaction hydrotreatment, thereby minimizing process complexity, leading to a more seamless integration into existing upstream facilities. In addition to the presentation of extensive laboratory data supporting the viability of this approach, recent results generated at the field-level will also be presented as we are currently operating a 500 barrel per day (emulsion basis) demonstration unit at a SAGD facility in a joint project with a prominent Canadian firm.

Presented By:

Sivaram Pradhan
Research Scientist
Nextstream

An Optimization Method for Steam Injection Distribution in SAGD

Category: Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

Steam injection distribution optimization problem refers to the process of distributing certain amount of high temperature steam among the wells in steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) oil field to maximize the total oil production. The steam injection volume of each well should be within a certain range and the total steam volume of the field is also restricted due to the capacity limitation of the steam generation facilities. Careful planning on steam injection volume is critical to improve energy efficiency and production performance of the oil field. Therefore, properly solving this problem is highly appealing to audience from oil and gas industry and scientific field. In this study, a novel optimization method that integrates Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) and dynamic programming (DP) is presented to solve the steam injection distribution optimization problem. In the proposed method, LSTM prediction models are constructed based on the historical steam injection and oil production data with the appropriate timesteps selected by genetic algorithm (GA) to predict short-term future oil production of each well. With the result of LSTM prediction model, the DP algorithm starts from optimizing steam injection of a single well in the oil field and then gradually increases the number of wells considered in the algorithm. When the DP optimized the steam injection distribution of all the wells in the field, the maximum oil production of the field therefore obtained. Two pads (Pad C and Pad D) from Suncor MacKay River oil field are used to conduct the three experiments in this study. The objective of the first experiment is to determine the most appropriate timestep for each LSTM prediction model using GA. The result shows that for different prediction model, the selected timestep is also different. The second experiment compares the prediction results between the LSTM prediction model and traditional artificial neural network (ANN) prediction model using root mean squared error, mean absolute error and Pearson correlation coefficient as evaluation metrics. The result demonstrates that the LSTM prediction model achieves better prediction performance than traditional ANN prediction model on all the evaluation metrics. In the third experiment, the proposed steam injection distribution optimization method is applied to the two pads for six months. The result shows that the monthly steam-oil ratios of the two pads for six months are all decreased, and the method improves the oil production of the two pads by 12.25% and 24.07%, respectively. As the novelty of this research, a novel short-term oil production prediction method which combines GA an LSTM is proposed, and DP is first attempted to solve the steam injection distribution optimization problem.

Presenter By:

Changlin Yang
Research Assistant
University of Calgary

Cavitation-induced Upgrading of Heavy Oil

Category: Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

Heavy oil from the oil sands production poses several challenges on transportation through pipelines as well as quality of heavy oil. Partial upgrading of heavy oil targets meeting the pipeline specification with reduced diluent while improving the quality at the extraction location. This allows more capacity of heavy oil in the pipeline-based transportations and minimizing the downstream processing. Drawbacks of conventional partial upgrading of unconventional hydrocarbon resources include high energy consumption, high initial cost, and high initial capital expenditure (CAPEX). Traditional methods of catalytic and thermal upgrading occurs at high temperature and pressure leading to greater greenhouse gas emission due to heavy energy usage. The motivation behind this study is the low energy-based partial upgrading with cavitation-assisted upgrading with proprietary additives to overcome the drawbacks associated with the conventional partial upgrading of unconventional hydrocarbons. Cavitation, in principle, is a phenomenon comprising of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid medium. This study uses the ultrasonic irradiation as a method to induce cavitation. When a liquid is subjected to a sound wave, a variation of sinusoidal pressure allows the formation and growth of bubbles to occur through expansion and compression. Oscillation and collapse of bubbles lead to extreme conditions, creating regional hotspots capable of breaking chemical bonds of hydrocarbons. This study uses n- hexadecane as a model molecule. Gas chromatography, viscometer, and density meters were used to analyze experimental results. Upon upgrading of the model molecule, both light and heavy hydrocarbons are observed on gas chromatograms. To achieve a higher selectivity of light hydrocarbons, a hydrogen donor was introduced in the process. In turn, the effect of hydrogen donor increased the selectivity of light hydrocarbon. Based on the experimental results in this study, the cavitation-assisted partial upgrading with stimulators is a viable alternative to the conventional upgrading of unconventional hydrocarbons.

Presenter By:

Min-Hyung Lee

MSc Student  

University of Calgary

Bomin Kim     

MSc Student  

University of Calgary

Dispersed Surface Modified Ferroelectric Nanoparticles with Potential Applications in Heavy Oil Recovery

Category: Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

 

The common challenges in oil and gas industry are high cost of production, high water/steam usage, high levels of greenhouse gases emissions and poor bitumen recovery. Nanotechnology specifically nanomaterials have been recently demonstrated an important role in improving the efficiency of oil refining and petrochemical processes. They have successfully revealed many potential applications acting as nanofluids, nanocatalysts, nanoemulsion or nanomembrane in controlling and enhancing obstacles including heavy oil viscosity, interfacial tension, rock surface wettability, foam stability, oil/water or gas separation, corrosion inhibition, water usage and pollution reduction. Discovery of novel synthesis method of nanomaterials, improving advanced materials’ properties in water and/or oil media and expansion of applications of existing nanomaterials require further research and consideration.  In this work, the synthesis method of dispersed ferroelectric nanoparticles and their prospective applications in the oil and gas industry will be introduced. Ferroelectric materials which exhibit spontaneous electric polarization have been widely used in the electronic technology such as dielectrics, memories and sensors due to their impressive properties including high permitivities, polarization hysteresis, piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. However, this group of materials has been barely employed in oil and gas industry. Furthermore, most of these compounds are not soluble in water or oil. Thus for better performance in oil production and recovery processes, the engineered surface nanoparticles with good colloidal stability in water is highly needed. In order to achieve reliable and practical nanoparticles in fast, simple and eco-friendly preparation method using for heavy oil and tailing recovery, the economical and non-toxic coated nanoparticles with controlled size and shape have been developed and characterized. These findings have the high potential to employ these particles as the contrast agents, heat generator or CO2 absorber to enhance oil sands extraction, tailing ponds recovery process and CO2 reduction.

 

Presented By:

 

Maryam Taheri
Postdoctural Researcher
University of Calgary

 

High Flowrate Production Using Shrouded ByPass Design

Category: Field Development & Infrastructure

1. Objective/Scope: A new concept for high flow applications in slim shrouded ESP system is presented in this abstract, allowing just part of the fluid to pass over the motor for its refrigeration, and other part to bypass the shrouds and get directly into the intake of the pump. Main objective is the optimization of the ESP in such conditions, reducing drop pressures and velocity pass over the motor when its close to its maximum. 2. Methods, Procedures, Process: A new intake was designed especially for this alternative configuration, including two open holes at the top of the hanger shrouds section. The diameter of this holes has the specific size to control how much fluid will go directly into the pump without pass over the shrouds, for a certain range of production fluid. A FEA study was carried out in order to prove the hole system at different flow conditions and insurance the minimum production allowed to keep the motor temperature controlled. Additionally, tests were performed in order to validate the FEA study. 3. Results, observation, conclusions.: There are some restrains on using the 375 series motor on a 4.50” shroud at high flow applications (>400m3/day), long units are normally required to handle the power, and scales and solid can be present in some cases. In such conditions drop pressure starts to be a concern, and also the maximum velocity allowed to avoid erosion-corrosion. Bypassing part of the production fluid will reduce those effects, optimizing the ESP operation in this extremely applications. FEA analysis has been conducted in order to verify the behavior of the production fluid, and it was determined the minimum allowable flowrate to run this configuration. Since were founded high rates of velocity inside of the designed unit, it was property protected against erosion in some specific points. Parts have been assembled successfully, and the well is already assigned for its intervention during the incoming weeks. 4. Novel/Additive information. The novelty of this idea is that it helps on reduce risks on produce high flowrates in shrouded ESP, being able to extend the operating range of the system when a standard configuration is limited by the velocity pass over the motor.

Presented By:

Juan Cruz Pires
Lead Techincal Support
Baker Hughes

Human Factors Impact on Industry and the Environment

Category: People & Talent

New technology is evolving rapidly, creating new environmental and industrial challenges that must be considered.  Technology continues to focus on the demands of industry to increase efficiency and production output.  At the same time, industry must quickly adapt to these new advances in order to compete and grow and yet also must focus on increased awareness for the need to evaluate and mitigate environmental impact.  Recent studies indicate that the use of automation in the workplace will nearly double in the next few years.  If we look at the control room as being the core of the industrial environment, the focus has been mainly centred on the advances in technology.  Little focus has been on the humans that control this technology ? there is still not enough consideration for the most critical component that can not only impact production and output but also create a negative impact on the environment as a result of human error.  With Industry 4.0 focusing on the latest and greatest technology, the concern is that the human involved in developing, implementing and monitoring this technology will be overshadowed by technology itself.  No matter how quickly technology advances, it will always ultimately be controlled by humans.  And human error must be mitigated ?" one mistake can result in huge and in some cases irreversible environmental damage.  The increasing need for a focus on the psycho-social work environment must be considered.  The challenge in today’s industrial control room environment is not only with the transition to more technologically advanced operations, but also to the need for more technologically advanced operators as a result.   However, at the same time, the risk of human error must be mitigated ?" one mistake can result in huge and in some cases irreversible environmental damage.  How has this critical element been downplayed to a point that it is almost non-existent when evaluating environmental risk?  The purpose of this presentation is to take a step back and identify some key considerations of human factors within the control room, and how ignoring this critical element can impact not only production but also the environment.  What is being lost in the rapid changes we are facing in this newest phase of the industrial revolution is the impact of the control room environment on the human, and the resulting potential negative impact of the human on the environment.

 

Presented By:

 

Fiona Campbell
Senior Consultant Control Room Design and Human Factors
ABB AB

 

Massive Generation of Gas Nano-Bubbles in Water

Category: Environmental Management

Nanobubbles (NBs) are nanoscale gaseous domains than can exist in bulk liquids or at their solid surfaces. Their appearance in aqueous solutions has attracted significant attention in the last decade due to their apparent long-time stability (over timescales of weeks and months), and high potential for real-world applications by allowing for significantly enhance amounts of gas to be available in solution. Amongst these applications, NBs can be applied towards wastewater treatment, nanoscopic cleaning, microfluidics, hetero-coagulation, and medical applications. However, the generation of NBs has proven to be somewhat difficult and energy intensive, for example involving intense agitation of the solution followed by bubble separation, or using microfluidic flows. Thus, to this point their potential applications have been effectively limited. Although surface NBs have been generated and observed using various experimental methods, bulk-liquid NBs have been much less investigated. Arguments based on Laplace pressure considerations would suggest that bulk NBs should be very transient features in solution, so the origins of their apparent stability has remained elusive. NBs are known to possess negative zeta potentials, resulting in mutual repulsions that are usually sufficiently large to prevent coalescence and slow any buoyancy rise. To explain this behaviour, it has been conjectured that NBs feature a build-up of anions (i.e. OH-) at the gas/liquid interface, yet observations of stable NBs in highly pure water suggest an alternative explanation is needed. In this presentation, we will tackle these pressing and important questions directly. We will demonstrate a novel method for the massive and rapid generate of methane, oxygen, and carbon dioxide NBs in bulk aqueous solution with low energy input. Using appropriate experimental probes, for example Dynamic Light Scattering, we characterize the NBs present and confirm their long-time stability. Using both molecular simulations and theoretical development, we also provide a consistent explanation for the apparent stability of aqueous NBs and their measured zeta potentials. This explanation identifies unique features of the air-water interface as the origins for NB behaviour. The work has been accepted for publication in Science Advances (manuscript ID aaz0094) and will appear in early 2020. It is currently under embargo and hence we cannot provide details of the methods or specific results in this abstract. By achieving massive enhancement of bulk-NB formation in water, we are able to realize dramatically elevated levels of gas solubility in water many times the Henry’s-Law solubility. This discovery is expected to have enormous ramifications in, for example, wastewater-treatment and process industries, in addition to significantly accelerating gas-(diffusion)-limited processes. In effect, we realize here “nano-porous liquids” in the form of gas NBs in a simple, facile and energy efficient manner, with highly elevated surface-to-volume ratios in addition to far greater gas-accommodation levels.

Presented By:

Peter Kusalik
Professor of Chemistry
University of Calgary

Modelling of Nanofluids Injection as Wettability Modifiers

Category: Reservoir Engineering

It is well known that the efficiency of enhanced oil recovery is primarily affected by several chemical compounds injected by different processes to the reservoir; nevertheless, in recent years an enormous expectation in procedures using nanofluids as local wettability modifier agents has grown, being subject of debate in the experimental literature, modelling and simulation on core samples and field cases. This work proposes a new model based on phenomenological transport and retention principles for nanoparticles on a hypothetical volatile-oil reservoir in order to predict their perdurability as a treatment in porous media and to measure their wettability alterations effects in real-time. This study involves gathered knowledge from literature and evaluates mathematical performance according to the oil production subsequent to an intervention with a nanofluid, which also adopts the current model to a field pilot case, to contribute the prediction of oil recovery factor after the nanofluid injection with the specific purpose of modifying the rock wettability. The model is based on transport equations and local relative permeability alteration to explore the way how oil recovery factor depends on nanoparticles retained onto rock. Retention coefficient, mobilization coefficient and maximum retention capacity of the rock are considered, which are unique to each type and size of nanoparticles, making possible to reasonably predict any other scenario with identical nanoparticles. The model was compared with experimental data at laboratory scale of multiple core samples which demonstrated that this retention/mobilization model is capable to reliably predict nanoparticles transport and its significant interactions in porous media. Perdurability was modelled and simulated in the hypothetical scenario proposed, whereas oil recovery factor was compared to an injection scenario in the absence of nanoparticles as a reference. Experimental pilot matched reasonably well to perdurability of nanoparticles simulated with the current model where observations made sense due to nanoparticles are typically retained by adsorption mechanisms in porous media and eventually withdrawn by fluid flow production as a dragging effect. This model equally predicts the nanoparticle concentration distribution on wetting phases, its dynamic retention on matrix surface and its further perdurability. In addition, oil recovery factor is used as a comparison to the experimental data, even though is undoubtedly relevant for the impact on oil & gas industry. Furthermore, rock wettability alteration was observed since two sets of relative permeability curves with different rock wettability were used as a function of nanoparticles retained onto rock which stood for prior-to-afterward nanoparticles treatment previously obtained in a laboratory. In consequence, incremental oil production data after a stimulation process showed that nanoparticles retention/mobilization model worked as it was intended to do it. Hence, this research can be used to supporting techno-economic studies for Well intervention involving nanofluids.

Presented By: 

Ricardo Pastrana Cruz
MSc. Student
University of Sherbrooke

 

MV VFDs for Electric Compression: Controlling Power Factor & Moving Outdoors

Category: Pipeline & Processing Facilities

 

Gas compressors of all forms, and types are the workhorses in nearly every aspect of the gas value chain. From exploration, production, transmission, storage, distribution and utilization, gas compressors of all sizes are employed in the industry. Historically, the industry has been dominated by mechanical prime movers such as gas turbines, steam turbines, and diesel engines for multi megawatt rotating machinery. In recent times, the prime movers have become difficult and expensive to service and maintain. Medium Voltage (MV) variable frequency drives (VFDs) and electric motors provide a viable solution to replace mechanical equipment with electric solutions. Scholarly articles exist on the conventional benefits of VFDs such as energy savings, flow/pressure control and reduce starting inrush current. However, there is a general resistance to electrical equipment. While several reasons exist towards avoiding electric solutions altogether, chief among them is the need to erect a temperature controlled building near the installation to install the delicate VFD. This increases CAPEX and OPEX costs since indoor VFDs while being highly efficient, reject roughly 3.5% of their rating as heat. This must be managed by substantial HVAC systems. Recent, experience and research in air-flow and heat management techniques have enabled VFDs to be moved outdoors eliminating the need for a temperature controlled environment such as an Ehouse or a building and the air-conditioning system altogether. Further, drive topologies with active front end converters are being deployed that not only maintain unity power factor on the connected bus, but also inject reactive power there by improving the overall power factor of a gas gather station, transmission or compression station or wherever the drives might be connected to in a plant. These two drive enhancements provide a huge incentive to either convert existing mechanical prime movers to electric or conceptualize a complete electric outdoor-based solution for gas compressors. In this presentation, we discuss how these drive enhancements work, design philosophy, provide application guidance and help the end user, specifier or the OEM to think of creative ways of powering their gas compressors impacting initial cost, variable running cost and more importantly running their plants at peak system efficiency.

 

Presented By:

 

Manish Verma
Business Development Specialist
TMEIC

 

New Upscaling Solution for Large Models

Category: Reservoir Engineering

Objectives/Scope In this paper we present an extended local solution for upscaling based on 3D electrical circuits representing variable size grid blocks. Homogeneous parts of models are represented by fewer larger grid blocks while heterogeneous parts are represented by many smaller homogeneous grid blocks. Adaptive octree data structure is implemented in building and simulating models that are equivalent to 109 blocks. Simulations run on a typical laptop in minutes not hours and compare results from nine different upscaling configurations. This solution works well at pore scale and reservoir scale without modeling flow dynamics that limits the model size. Methods, Procedures, Process The upscaling is based on connectivity between two opposite faces of the model and follows principles of capillary pressure tests. In virtual tests at pore scale the wetting and non-wetting fluids interact under varying pressure in the 3D effective network. This process simulates trapping mechanisms when one of the fluids is surrounded by the other fluid type. The model's electrical properties are derived from grid blocks at the lowest octree level through recursive upscaling in a depth-first tree traversal. The resistivity estimates come from three different configurations for electrical circuits representing grid blocks. The first two models correspond to the earliest methods of the porous media simulations and upscaling with bundles of pipes. In the third method, blocks are replaced by sets of six resistors organized as 3D crosses. Sets of eight blocks with the same parent are replaced by 48-element circuits used to estimate the resistance in horizontal and vertical directions. This process models 3D pore connectivity, checks fluid types, and tests path dimensions relatively to the pressure values. This extends simulations with a regular cubic lattice yielding a network coordination number greater than six. Results, Observations, Conclusions Prior to the 100% saturation with the wetting phase, the total porosity, the effective porosity, and the path statistics (tortuosity) between opposite faces in horizontal direction are estimated. During the drainage-imbibition tests the non-wetting and wetting phase percentages with nine resistivity values are recorded at each pressure. The first three resistivity estimates represent arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic averages. Next, two sets of estimates in horizontal and vertical directions are reported. Each set contains the resistivity estimates from the chain, bundle, and mesh algorithms. Different model structures result in varying degrees of the hysteresis in fluid saturations and electric properties during these tests. The most advanced interconnected mesh works best for layered and/or correlated pore networks. Break-through events are detected in drainage and imbibition. 3D and 2D visualizations present models and selected parts of the interconnected network. Novel/Additive Information Differences between nine estimates indicate uncertainties when evaluating bounds in upscaled properties for reservoir simulations. Resistivity can be substituted for permeability transforms.

Presented By:

Leon Fedenczuk
Analytical Consultant
Gambit Consulting Ltd

The Key To Project Success? It’s All in How You Start!

Category: People & Talent

A project manager’s story is commonplace. “I’m always excited to kick-off a new project. To successfully deliver the equipment and materials needed for construction, I laser focus on goals for budget and schedule. I know that 80% of project success depends on how we start. I want everyone to enjoy meeting milestones and working together.”

“Unfortunately, once a project is mobilized, I often struggle to balance the many conflicting priorities and keep up with emails and meetings. Despite all the upfront coordination and information sharing, it seems like it’s never enough. It feels like something in this process is missing.”

“Even after our post-project reviews and compiling a list of lessons learned, the incremental improvements don’t seem to solve the problems. We end up struggling with the same issues. Non-technical issues are responsible for most budget and schedule overruns.”

We know that every project is at risk for budget and schedule overruns – and the bigger the project, the bigger the risk. The problems are recognized industry-wide and are significant. Our industry is losing many talented professionals who are not easily replaced. Recruiting new personnel is only half of the answer. New personnel lack experience and know-how. Without effective knowledge transfer from departing and existing talent the challenges, costs, and risks are escalated.

Since we can’t reverse the loss of personnel, we need to focus on knowledge transfer. It’s the most cost-efficient way to strengthen project teams and supply chains. The alternative is to hire personnel and hope they’ll figure it out, somehow. Since hope is not a strategy, the only reasonable thing to do is address these challenges proactively.

Knowledge transfer is the process by which experienced personnel share-distribute knowledge, skills and behaviours with colleagues, and with personnel who will replace them. It is needed between, and within, companies and projects to strengthen supply chains. The main benefits are:

1. Reduced risk of budget and schedule overruns;

2. Improved processes that are easier for teams and suppliers to execute; and

3. Enhanced reputation for consistent on-budget and on-time project delivery.

To reduce your risk of budget and schedule overruns, contact us. Let the KT Project help you connect the dots.

Presented By:

Roy Christensen
Project Success Consultant
KT Project

The Technology Gap in Chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery ? A Solution from an Engineered Enzyme

Category: Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

 

Alberta statistics from the Department of Energy indicate that after the application of primary and secondary oil recovery techniques, two thirds of the original oil-in-place (OOIP) remains. This is due to three factors; residual oil being trapped by capillary forces, bypassed oil due to reservoir heterogeneities or recovery efficiencies adversely affected by poor mobility ratios. Chemical EOR has long promised to be the solution to increase overall recovery factors, but results are mixed, and economics are severely challenged. It is argued that a technology gap exists that is deterring operators from implementing chemical EOR at scale, and that a new technology may be required to fill this gap. Conventional chemical EOR methods present substantial limitations such as high product loss due to excess adsorption and limited operating ranges associated with temperature, salinity and pH. Additionally, common chemicals such as polymers, surfactants and alkali come with significant health, safety and environmental considerations. A further challenge of chemical EOR is formation damage. Ultimately, the cost and risk associated with a chemical program implementation appears unfavourable and often is uneconomic, particularly in an oil-price constrained environment.  GreenZyme is a true biological catalyst, not a chemical, and is an inert and water-soluble enzyme protein that is specifically engineered to interact with hydrocarbons. It releases micro-oil droplets of oil to reduce interfacial tension and contact angle in the reservoir, thus increasing the mobility of capillary trapped oil. It has been tested in the laboratory to establish its basic properties, as well as tested in cores where a range of incremental core flood recoveries have been demonstrated. It is unaffected by adverse well conditions of salinity, temperature and pH, and is compatible with existing chemicals. This engineered enzyme does not suffer high product-loss to adsorption or lose efficacy over distance traveled giving it a huge distribution advantage. It has been applied successfully in the field globally on a range of reservoirs.  Recently, several field trials of engineered enzymes have been conducted in North America and the Middle East that show sustained oil production increases for many months, above an established baseline. These trial results were shown to be economic for the operator with no negative consequences on equipment or the reservoir. Ongoing monitoring of these results continue to show that incremental oil is being recovered in these applications.  Finally, given the positive results to date, massive unrealized potential of improved recovery of Alberta’s original-oil-in-place, and considering the technology gap within the EOR space to date, engineered enzymes may be the solution.  The next steps are to continue conducting controlled EOR pilots in larger reservoirs where the technology can be optimized in terms of application specific treatment variables, and then after successful pilots, scaled across the field.

 

Presented By:

Allan Bertram
Co-founder
SW Energy Frontiers Ltd.

 

 

Zero Emissions, Low Cost Hydrogen Production from Oil Reservoirs

Category: Alternative Energy

 

The oil sands deposits in Western Canada not only represent a vast store of hydrocarbons (oil) that can be converted into fuel and petrochemicals but also a vast hydrogen store ? a super clean valuable energy vector and chemical feedstock. With the need to find new energy recovery processes for oil sands reservoirs that have low energy and emissions intensities, hydrogen production is a viable alternative for energy production from heavy oil and oil sands reservoirs by using in situ gasification technology. Gasification reactions, together with the water-gas shift reaction, enable the generation of hydrogen from both bitumen and water within the oil sands reservoir. With hydrogen separation membranes in the production wells, other products from the reactions remain in the reservoir. Thus, there is potential for hydrogen production processes from oil sands reservoirs. The research documented here describes an optimized design for an in-situ gasification of bitumen process for surface production of hydrogen only, as well as an operating design for application in a heavy oil reservoir located in Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

Presented By:

 

Grant Strem
CEO
Proton Technologies